FAQs

FAQs

You can find information about ACC-funded counselling after sexual assault at findsupport.co.nz and see our local ACC counsellors here To find an ACC registered counsellor use the ‘find a therapist’ search tool and choose your location.    

New Zealand police sexual assault webpage

 

This brochure from the police tells you what happens when you report a sexual assault.

 

New Zealand police have developed a series of videos that take a step-by-step look at what happens when a person talks with them about their options after a sexual assault. Click here to see videos

The Victims Information website helps victims of sexual violence make informed choices about talking to the police and providing support through the court process

 

(also called Drug Assisted Sexual Assault or DASA)
DFSA is the term used to describe any type of sexual harm (sexual assault and sexual violence) that occurs whilst the person is either drunk or intoxicated with alcohol and/or drugs. More info

Consent means actively agreeing to be sexual with someone. Consent lets someone know that sex is wanted. Sexual activity without consent is rape or sexual assault.

Useful videos Let’s talk about consent and Consent

Sexual assault or abuse is when someone makes you do something sexual when you don’t want to. Some examples of sexual assault or abuse are:

  • Unwanted kissing or touching
  • Unwanted rough or violent sexual activity
  • Someone putting their fingers, their penis or other object into your body
  • Refusing to use condoms or restricting someones access to contraception
  • Keeping someone from protecting themselves from sexually transmitted infections (STIs)
  • Sexual contact with someone who is very drunk, drugged, unconscious or otherwise unable to give a clear and informed ‘yes’ or ‘no’
  • Threatening someone into unwanted sexual activity
  • Repeatedly pressuring someone to have sex or perform sexual acts
  • Repeatedly using sexual insults toward someone
  • Someone showing you pictures of people having sex, someone showing you their body or making you show them your body

Whether the accused is a stranger, acquaintance, spouse, or friend is irrelevant.

Sexual contact or behaviour that happens when you don’t want it – is never OK.

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To access any of our services and talk in confidence to someone who will understand,
phone 03 548 2407 or
email sash@sash.co.nz